SeaKnots

Why is it Called a Noreaster When it Comes From the South?

That's my question for the day. Hurricaine Ida took a stroll up from Alabama to hit us here in Hampton Roads, Virginia yesterday. We were expecting strong winds and rain, but nothing too terrible, I thought. What we got was 60 - 75 MPH winds (that's category 1, folks) and flooding.

Read More Here

Views: 9

Comment

You need to be a member of SeaKnots to add comments!

Join SeaKnots

Comment by PCarrico on November 26, 2009 at 1:37pm
And in the Gulf Stream off the East Coast of the USA, the waves get massivly humongous and square during Nor' Easters. On the coast, lots of beach errosion.
Comment by Mike Brown on November 16, 2009 at 9:12pm
Terri's answer is close. Since it's a low pressure system it rotates counter clockwise. If part of the low is over water, which is what happens when they run up the east coast, it picks up moisture from the ocean and dumps it back on land with winds out of the north east. Therefore the name North Easter. It's when we get out biggest rain and snowfalls.
Comment by Terri on November 14, 2009 at 10:19am
Newbie thought's on...... cause it rotates north to east...counterclockwise....lol, dunno..that's my answer and i'm sticking with it.. till someone else responds. Just glad it ain't snow! That'll be next month

Latest Activity

dfdfjdf posted a discussion
Sunday
dfdfjdf posted a discussion
Dec 1
dfdfjdf posted discussions
Nov 29
dfdfjdf posted a discussion
Nov 27
dfdfjdf posted a discussion
Nov 26
dfdfjdf posted discussions
Nov 25
dfdfjdf posted a discussion
Nov 24
dfdfjdf posted a discussion
Nov 23
ADVERTISE ON SEAKNOTS CONTACT US AT: 
candrac@sailforwater.com

© 2022   Created by CAN DRAC.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service